Blueberry Cobbler Time!

Love this cobbler for how quickly it goes together plus it takes less fruit than a pie.  And it is gluten free for all of you who must avoid gluten. I honestly thought I had posted a recipe for this treat a year or two ago. Shocked to find no such recipe in my blog archives. It be blueberry season so perfect timing to post this classic dessert.

This recipe is the same basic one I posted for peach cobbler and for rhubarb cobbler in the past; it is modified from a muffin dry mix in Bette Hagman’s book, More from the Gluten-Free Gourmet and uses a flour mix that will give you 4 cups of the dry ingredients.  One cup will make an 8×8 pan of cobbler topping.  I keep the rest of my dry mix in the freezer and a pan of cobbler can be thrown together in less than 10 minutes plus baking time.  What a time saver this mix is! I make all sorts of cobblers with it.

It’s best to always get the fruit part cooking before putting the topping together so the fruit is hot and ready for the topping and can go right into the oven.

I make this blueberry cobbler most every time we go camping; put the dry cobbler mix in a baggie labeled cobbler, topping mix of sugar and flour in a separate labeled baggie.  I bring a small mixing bowl and whisk; don’t recommend mixing the cobbler cake in a baggie: it is difficult to mix it properly.  I start the fruit cooking on the camp stove and then after I mix up the cobbler topping and it’s ready to bake, I cover the pot with foil and bake it on the grill over the campfire. Takes a bit longer to bake; keep checking it every 5 minutes once it has baked 30 minutes. Make sure your pot is fire proof…

Angie’s Blueberry Cobbler

Dry Cobbler Mix use one cup for this recipe and freeze the rest

2 ¼ cups white rice flour

½ cup potato starch (not potato flour!)

½ cup tapioca flour

1 tsp. baking soda

4 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp salt

1 tsp. xanthan gum

1/3 cup sugar

Fruit Filling

4 cups fresh blueberries; rinsed and stems removed

½-2/3 cup sugar –more or less depending on sweet tooth

2 tbsp. GF flour; I use tapioca flour

1/4 tsp cinnamon

Directions:

Place the fruit in a sauce pan. Stir together the sugar, cinnamon and flour and mix into the fruit.  Cook on the stove top for 5-10 minutes until it is thickened and hot.  Stir often so it doesn’t stick or burn. If you are worried it will burn, add a tbsp. of water to it and keep stirring. Pour into a buttered 8 inch square or round pan, top with big blops of the cobbler topping.

Cobbler Topping

1 cup dry baking mix

2 large eggs

2 tbsp melted butter or canola oil

¼ to 1/3 cup milk/buttermilk

½ tsp. vanilla  *optional

Mix the wet ingredients and then add to the dry mix in a big bowl.   Mix briefly: do not over-mix for best texture.  Use a big spoon to plop it right away on the hot fruit.  Bake immediately as baking soda and powder can’t stand around waiting or they lose their oomph!

Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes.  The top should be lightly browned and spring back when you poke it with your finger.  If it looks damp or squishy bake it 5 more minutes before removing from oven.  cobbler in dish

Let cool 5-7 minutes before serving as it will burn your mouth right out of the oven!  Some people love it with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.  This tasty cobbler is perfect just on its own.

Notes: I use canola oil most of the time but butter is great too. The original recipe was 1/3 cup milk but I have cut back to ¼ and I like it a bit better; less runny. I also use buttermilk for mine but you can use milk, fruit juice or even water for the liquid. Can’t say it will taste as good…but if you have to avoid dairy….

Waffle Heaven in a State Park

Camping is fun for me; I love to cook over an open fire or on the camp stove. Summer is a great time for fresh produce. If you can combine cooking and being in nature that is the best deal for me!

Now this is car camping, you know… where you drive there with a trunk full of sleeping bags, tent, tarps, comfy clothes, cook stove, lanterns, and coolers of food… So I had lots food and I also brought my cast iron waffle maker; an antique from the 1920s that was my sister Margie’s and before that my parents.  It was kinda messed up when she gave it to me but Joe and I worked hard to bake off the crud and now it works fantastically… and corn on the cob, shrimp and swordfish (frozen), half frozen chicken thighs, lamb loin chops and a zillion other food items.   Nothing like traveling light!

So we enjoyed some good food. For breakfast I made waffles, then  pancakes, and then more waffles the third morning.  The pancakes are lovely; for a year or two I just couldn’t find any pancakes that measured up to what I felt they should taste like.  These are from Elizabeth Hasselbeck’s cookbook. Sometimes I add extra milk if they are too thick. I pour the batter right out of a mixing bowl with a pour spout onto the griddle.

And, again, I forgot to take pix of the waffle iron in action; have one shot of a waffle quarter from last summer; before I snarfed it down so here is that recipe (my version; based on a pancake recipe in Gluten-Free Baking Classics by Annalise Roberts. This recipe is great for camping because buttermilk travels better than regular milk and it also uses oil not butter in the waffle; easier to deal with than melting butter on the camp stove…. The other week I was out of buttermilk and used kefir, a fermented milk; worked fantastically.

waffle

Cinnamon Waffles (for 2; double for 4 people)

1 cup brown rice flour mix

1 tbsp. sugar

¼ tsp. salt

1 ¾ tsp. baking powder

½ tsp. baking soda

½ tsp. cinnamon

1 large egg, well beaten

2 tbsp. canola oil or melted butter plus extra for greasing griddle.

2/3 cup buttermilk

½ tsp. vanilla extract

cooking spray (kind with no flour in it)

Directions:  To make it portable; measure the dry ingredients into a zip-lock baggie. I like to write the other ingredients on with a black Sharpie marker and label it waffles…so you don’t use the pancake mix by mistake!  Beat the egg in a large mixing bowl, add the oil, buttermilk and vanilla (optional when camping but I did bring it this summer and they were so yummy). Pour the dry mix into the bowl and whisk briefly until fairly well mixed.

While you are doing that mixing step the waffle iron should be heating.  I use a round cast iron waffle iron; please do spray it with cooking spray before heating and then I melt about 1-2 tsp. of butter into the 4 quarters; I blop the chunk around with a fork so some melts into each part of the iron.  Flip the iron over just before putting in the batter. I use a big spoon to glop it into the waffle iron.  One big glop in each half.  Close the iron and let it bake about 2 minutes. Flip it and bake 1-2 more minutes, or however long your waffle iron takes.  I serve it with real maple syrup; something this good deserves the best.  Before I serve the first waffle I break off a section and eat it hot and plain; you can really taste the cinnamon that way.  Make sure your waffles are crisp not soft. The crisp is Everything!

We had scrambled eggs and breakfast maple flavored sausage links; both go fantastically well with waffles.

Brown Rice Flour Mix (it is the same as King Arthur’s gf flour mix)
2 c brown rice flour

2/3 c potato starch

1/3 c tapioca flour

Originally posted in July 2015 and again in 2016 with minor text revisions. Recipe the same.

Waffles are for Camping

Camping is fun for me; I love to cook over an open fire or on the camp stove. Plus, summer is a great time for fresh produce. We had blackberries, strawberries, bananas, cherries and a cantaloupe… If you can combine cooking, fresh fruit and being in nature that is the best deal for me!

camping 6-16 001

Hickory Run State Park reservoir

Now this was car camping, you know… where you drive there with a trunk full of sleeping bags, our big palace of a tent, comfy clothes, a double burner cook stove, lanterns, tarps and two coolers crammed with food… Plus I had a big plastic tub full of food that didn’t need chilling and my camping kitchen which is a green backpack full of many useful items for cooking outdoors. I also brought my cast iron waffle maker; an antique from the 1920s that was my sister Margie’s and before that my parents.  It was kinda messed up when she gave it to me but Joe and I worked hard to bake off the crud and now it works fantastically… and corn on the cob, half frozen chicken thighs and a zillion other food items.   Nothing like traveling light!

So we enjoyed some good food. Really good food. For breakfast I made pancakes one morning and then my cinnamon waffles the next.  The pancakes are lovely; until last year I just couldn’t find any pancakes that measured up to what I felt they should taste like.  These are from Elizabeth Hasselbeck’s cookbook. Sometimes I add extra milk if they are too thick. I pour the batter off a big serving spoon onto the griddle.  I forgot to take any pictures. Again. Boo hoo.

And I forgot to take pix of the waffle iron in action; have one shot of a waffle quarter from last summer; before I snarfed it down.

 

So here is that recipe (my version; based on a pancake recipe in Gluten-Free Baking Classics by Annalise Roberts. This recipe is great for camping because buttermilk travels better than regular milk and it also uses oil not butter in the waffle; easier to deal with than melting butter on the camp stove….

Cinnamon Waffles (for 2; double for 4 people)

1 cup brown rice flour mix

1 tbsp. sugar

¼ tsp. salt

1 ¾ tsp. baking powder

½ tsp. baking soda

½ tsp. cinnamon

1 large egg, well beaten

2 tbsp. canola oil

2/3 cup buttermilk

½ tsp. vanilla extract

Directions:  To make it portable; measure the dry ingredients into a zip-lock baggie. I like to write the other ingredients on with a black Sharpie marker.  Beat the egg in a large mixing bowl (yes I bring a mixing bowl camping, doesn’t everyone?) add the oil, buttermilk and vanilla (optional in my book when camping although I did bring it this time). Pour the dry mix into the bowl and whisk briefly until fairly well mixed. I have this cute whisk Joe gave me with an egg for the handle.  Does the job!

While you are doing that mixing step the waffle iron should be heating.  I have a fantastic round cast iron waffle iron; you should spray it with cooking spray before heating and then I melt about 1-2 tsp. of butter into the 4 quarters; I blop the chunk around with a fork so some melts into each part of the iron.  Flip the iron over just before putting in the batter. In truth I forgot the cooking spray; just used butter.  No sticking occurred! I use a big spoon to glop it into the waffle iron.  One big glop in each half.  Close the iron and let it bake about 2 minutes. Flip it and bake 1-2 more minutes, or however long your waffle iron takes.  I serve it with real maple syrup; something this special deserves the best.  Before I serve the first waffle I love to break off a section and eat it hot and plain; you can really taste the cinnamon that way.  Make sure your waffles are crisp not soft.

We had scrambled eggs and breakfast sausage links; both go fantastically with waffles.

Brown Rice Flour Mix (it is the same as King Arthur’s gf flour mix)
2 c brown rice flour

2/3 c potato starch

1/3 c tapioca flour

Originally posted July 2015 but revisions were made to text.  Recipe remains the same.